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jobs may stall out at a gm plant in germany. the u.s. automaker is out with plans to stop making its zafiras at its opel division in 2016. gm, however, is considering other options for the factory to stymie job losses. the carmaker is attempting to put the brakes on its losses in europe. the plant shutdown becomes the first for germany since world war ii. italian bond yields headed higher following news that prime minister mario monti plans to resign. monti's reign will come to an end in february, following passage of the 2013 budget. the move raises political concerns over italy in the midst of the eurozone crisis. monti has been credited with keeping italy's debt crisis under control. the japanese economy has some gross domestic problems. japan's gdp has contracted two quarters in a row, signaling it has entered recession. a recent territorial dispute with the chinese government and struggles following last year's tsunami continue to hurt japan's export market. an election next week in japan could have a large effect on fiscal policy. reports say delta is close to landing a deal th
to get the latest news. looking for confidence out of germany's ifo survey. if we can put it up on the screen, that would be a help as i'm working to get it up at the moment. as soon as we get the numbers on that front, i will bring them to you. looks like we're still waiting on that. in the meantime, send in your thoughts, questions and comments about the program to worldwide@cnbc.com. and the biggest news of the morning, we have a deal. after 14 hours of talkes and months of negotiations, an agreement has been reached on a pan european banking supervisor. european finance ministers say they've drawn up plans to allow the ecb to directly supervisor the three largest banks in each country except for the uk and sweden which have both opted out. european leaders need to give their seal of approval and silvia wadhwa is in brussels with the latest. sylvia, it sounds like the meeting went into the late hours of the night. it sounds like the uk and sweden got their way. how significant is this agreement? >> the early hours of the morning. one may wonder whether that's good news for sw
to get the latest results from germany's survey any second now. in the meantime, i can can bring you news. for example, on industrial orders and sales in italy, orders flat on the month, down .2 on the month for sales and down nearly 5% on the year. so confirming some of the weakness that we know we've seen previously in the italian economy. meanwhile, another gauge perhaps for the euro as we look to the strength of it lately. that's the current counselor plus which in october was an adjusted 3.9 billion euros, up quite a bit from the 2.5 billion reported for september. now that also comes after -- a day after the european union's report suggesting that in fact the european union would have to run a surplus, given its poor demographics over the next couple of years. now let's get a quick preview of the news. for that we head to patricia, awaiting the results. what do we expect to see? >> reporter: we're expecting the second consecutive month to the upside for the business sentiment next year in germany. november was a surprise after six months to the downside. we expect december to book i
. the christmas degree originated in germany based on a prop in a mid evil play commemorating adam and eve then came over to england and eventually the united states. do you know what country the christmas tree tradition came from? >> norway. >> united states? >> isn't it from norway? >> netherlands? >> united states. >> germany? >> germany? >> germany? >> am i right? >> i don't know. i'm just guessing. >> i am german ancestry. >> that hurts that you didn't know that? >> it does. >> what's that big thing right over there. what do you call that. >> a christmas tree. >> i think it's called a christmas tree. can you call it whatever you like as long as the people are with their families there is nothing wrong with it? >> they are calling it a holiday tree in rhode island because they want to be politically correct. >> it's a christmas tree. >> it's a christmas tree. >> i love christmas. >> you know there is a war on christmas, right? >> i haven't heard. >> no. you haven't heard of the war on christmas? >> no. how can you have a war with christmas? santa has a big army. >> they are very little
cheaper? europe. >> germany and france at two-week highs last week. >> there's a few countries over there. i like the relative value there. they've got a printing press. they're going to open that. what i learned is you don't fight the tape and don't fight a bailout. i've got about 30% off this country -- outside of this country. and added 10% in emerging markets. now i think that we've had a bloodless revolution again in china, i think it's a great place. look at emerging markets. better value while you wait around. >> and they've done well over the last year. it was just they've been the silent gain. you haven't quite realized they've been doing so well. >> i like it. i wouldn't rush into anything. if you hid cash on the side, what a good time getting in. >> this market has stopped reacting on a minute by minute basis to all the prognostications out of washington on the fiscal cliff. what do you make of that? are we becoming complacent? are we immune? what are you talking about on the floor? >> we just had the president speak. nothing there. china numbers tomorrow. then germany. maybe n
to germany and japan. an astonishing number. 70% of the profits in the country were recycled into europe and japan. the marshall plan is a very small target. i will not bore you with details. when they go to washington, it is not a philanthropic act on the pentagon's part. the united states federal government -- unless europe is dollar rise, unless they do not have dollars to spend purchasing the net exports of those who have surpluses, then they will stop having surplus. this is the surplus recycling mechanism. thus, we have the 20 years of the golden age. a period of immense stability very low inflation. universal growth. we had other problems. the lease from the macroeconomic point of view, it was a golden age. why is that? because the global surplus of recycling mechanism was sustained. why? because the united states stopped having a surplus by the end of the 1960's. how can you recycle surplus if you cannot have it. well, paul volcker -- been named may ring a bell. in 1971, paul volcker was an unknown working for another american. henry kissinger, who you may have heard of. before h
indeployment of the patriot missile batteries from u.s., germany and netherlands. this would serve to be a pretty firm warning to the flailing assad regime to mess with nato member, turkey. if you talk to some of most vocal critics, though of the proposal, and that would be the russians who are in brussels at that nato meet and who were here, putin in istanbul, meeting with turkish leadership yesterday, they argue further militarizing this long border will only serve to escalate tensions. >> all right. ivan, thanks so much. ivan watson in istanbul, who is being down near that bordertown that has been the subject of shelling. moving on. before the scandal broke, many people could have seen former cia director david patreaus running for office. and now there is news that he was indeed approached. the way he was approached may surprise you. >>> also -- israel standing firm on its decision to go forward with construction of new settlements in the west bank and east jerusalem. hear what that might mean for the middle east peace process if that even exists. and when you switch from anoth
morning. all right. coming up new at 10, germany's chancellor angela merkel says europe will have to work very hard to it maintain its current standard of living. at the top of the hour, find out what she's saying about welfare and here is another development from overseas. we brought you the story last week, french actor gerard depardu, he is leaving home, leaving france because of higher taxes and handed in his passport. now, the french prime minister has some choice words for mr. depardu. he's obviously in the happy with him and find out exactly what he said at ten o'clock eastern time this morning. time is money. 30 seconds, here is what else we've got for you, an in japan, again, a landslide win, so, what's the new prime minister going to do about the world's worst debt problem? print more money and stimulate more, too. build more infrastructure. will that work? we have our own resident japan expert. question, is jeff immelt's cozy relationship with the president costing general electric shareholders money? we will be discussing it. and i lost on friday when i questioned "the washing
of the most successful year over year appreciations of any developed country's equity markets? >> germany. >> bingo. i think of their own currency it's up like 30%. let's keep going. >> okay. so germany has been the engine of european growth. if germany slows down, the dynamic in europe is going to change dramatically. if this euro/yen goes through let's say 120, 125, 130 which is what they're pushing for, the german auto sector which has made great inroads against the japanese because the euro/yen as the japanese have held the yen has been over valued that is going to change the whole european dynamic. a slowing germany will become a wild card. that's my call for the biggest wild card in 2013. >> i tell you what. you have to go nose to nose with a country on the foreign exchange front, i think the japanese are going to be well matched with the mentality of what is going on in germany. listen, merry christmas. i know hannukah is over and you had a great hannukah. >> thank you. >> best holiday wishes to all the viewership from two old time traders. back to you. >> two of the best that is.
surpluses to germany and japan. an astonishing number. 70% of the profits in the country were recycled into europe and japan. the marshall plan is a very small target. i will not bore you with details. when they go to washington, it is not an act of philanthropic on the pentagon -- and at the plant for be on the pentagon fell apart -- it is not a philanthropic act on the pentagon's part. the united states federal government -- unless europe is dollar rise, unless they do not have dollars to spend purchasing the net exports of those who have surpluses, then they will stop having surplus. this is the surplus recycling mechanism. thus, we have the 20 years of the golden age. a period of immense stability very low inflation. universal growth. we had other problems. the lease from the macroeconomic point of view, it was a golden age. why is that? because the global surplus of recycling mechanism was sustained. why? because the united states stopped having a surplus by the end of the 1960's. how can you recycle surplus if you cannot have it. well, paul volcker -- been named may ring a bell.
by better than seven points and the nasdaq futures up, as well, by about 17. european shares rising. germany is up, the ftse is up, the france, the cac in france has turned slightly down. but, again, this is a marginal loss of about three points. most of the major asian stock markets were higher overnight. and among the catalyst here, signs that china's recovery is gaining traction. sources say that the bank of japan will ease monetary policy this week and consider adopting a 2% inflation target no later than january. policymakers are seen responding to pressure from the incoming prime minister there. shinzo abe for stronger efforts to beat deflation. in the meantime, india's central bank kept interest rates on hold yesterday ignoring pressure to reduce borrowing costs. policymakers said they were shifting the focus to reducing the economy and that raises the odds of a rate cut as early as january. andrew olson, over to you. >> ubs reportedly nearing a fine of up to $1.5 billion. the bank is close to finalizing a deal with regulators according to the financial times. about three dozen banker
this. if you look at other countries like germany, their middle class is in better shape. they've done better trading against the world, their companies are making money. so a lot of the things we heard that were not impossible, not possible in america are actually happening in germany, and their wages have gone up five times faster that than ours. there's something wrong inside the american economic and political system, and that's what this book is about. >> host: hedrick smith is the author. thank you for being on booktv. >> from the fourth annual boston book festival, a panel featuring author edward glaeser. it's about an hour, 15. >> good afternoon and thank you very much for coming to this auditorium today. let me introduce myself, i'm bob oakes from morning edition on wbur, boston's npr news station. [applause] thank you. thank you. i'm sure some of you are saying, wow, that's bob oakes? [laughter] i thought he was taller -- [laughter] i thought he was thinner, i thought he had more hair. [laughter] and, you know, the funny thing is that all those things were true last week. [la
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germany -- germany. adam: i ran to the studio. lori: well, states tell the obama administration whether they plan to build and operate their own health insurance exchanges or default and that the federal government do it. so far it looks like -- lori: adam: where are the long lines, frenzied crowds? iphone five made there debut in china, but to a been there done that response. take a look at metal as we head to break. ♪ [ male announcer ] this is amy. amy likes to invest in the market. she also likes to ride her bike. she knows the potential for making or losing money can pop up anytime. that's why she trades with the leader in mobile trading. so she's always ready to take action, no matter how wily... or weird... or wonderfully the market's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it just common sense. from td ameritrade. it just common sense. music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'
2007. but prior to this, ambassador burt was the u.s. ambassador to the federal republic of germany from 85-89. and before that worked in the state department assistant secretary of state for european and canadian affairs from 1983-85. and before that was the direct of political military affairs in the department of state. so he, along with his colleagues, has a long and imminent involvement in these issues. and, finally, last but not least, ambassador matlock known to many of us, career ambassador. he's been holding a series of academic posted i'm not going to list them all, since 1991. but during his 35 years in the american foreign service, 1956-91, he served as ambassador to the soviet union from 1987-1991. as special assistant to the president for national security affairs, and senior director for european and soviet affairs on the national security staff from 83-86. and as ambassador to czechoslovakia from 81-83. and i will not go over the rest of his eminent and long career in the interest of time. but i just did want to give you a brief recap of all three of them. and, of co
if the allies were going to germany were they getting pamphlets that said, don't say anything about the jews. >> that's exactly right. i think patrick is correct that we have to keep our troops safe. but if you made a parallel comparison like bill did, the assume usion is you would turn a blind eye to anti-semitism or worse, killing jews. the only answer is get the hell out of there or do something. but i don't know what to do. >> i go back to the center forearm me lessons learned who wrote this manual out of fort leavenworth. i don't know if you could win a long-term conflict without making friends. different than those on facebook. >> you know what would win over friends? dropping dvd's of "friends." >> ross and chandler. >> they love western culture. no they don't. you know what bothers me the most? feminists and beta males who spend their time on blogs going after sexist behaviors like fraternities or wall street. stuff like that. oh look at these guys. they never say anything about the stuff that is going on over there. they are bad stuff. >> i like beta males. >> you are not a beta mal
at germany. a lot of -- >> hong kong, germany, you name it. >> germany up 29% year-to-date. that has a lot to do with the ucb and the eurozone. this is a relative gain. lost in this conversation for a lot of u.s. investors, they are u.s. investors. they can't really invest globally to the same degree that we talk about, we say germany is up 29%, for a lot of investors that's out of their reach. >> if we didn't have the cliff today, we would have best trades of the year, jamie dimon buying jpmorgan when the whale hit. things looked really dark. some of the best trades happened obviously when it looked like the stocks were in for real trouble. >> look at the greek stock market. look at greek debt. i think it was third point that established a prominent position in greek debt and saw x number of returns thereafter. >> draw the lessons to today. as we teeter on the cliff, what would be the fear trade that people are shunning right now but may turn out to be the best trade looking back? >> i think it's something we already mentioned, and that's the defense sector. >> the sequestration sector is
growth pick up in the united states and britain. the agency is expecting weak growth ahead for germany and france. >>> pay for presidents of private colleges rose from the year prior. the president of the new school is the highest paid in the country. that is right here in new york city at more than $3 million. >>> national hockey league is canceling its regular season through december 30th, i know, due to lack of collective bargaining agreement. 526 games, more than 40% of the season has been canceled. that unfortunately is that [buzzer] that is end of today's speed read. liz: it is disgusting. it is horrifying. we don't seem to be any closer to a resolution on the fiscal cliff even though many are warning that the economy could face dire consequences if there is no agreement but one strategist says, why are you worrying about december 31st? that deadline isn't even the real fiscal cliff. david: that strategist is none other than peter schiff, ceo of europacific precious metals. friend of the show. peter, although i wish it was under better circumstances. you say the real cliff coming
china, germany, brazil. tavis that transform the way we think about education? do you think your role as straining american leaders? are you looking at attracting global leaders? >> there are so many questions. let me address a few of them. there are numerous kind of statistics that we have a preeminence of college graduates in our populations and levels of participation. we are losing this. we have once last three of the world's college graduates. that is an interesting illustration of a shift in the dynamism. i see this when i travel. a huge commitment to public resources. huge energy to enthusiasm of higher education. india wants 1500 new universities by 2020. alicia's in a meeting about hong kong this week. i learned that hong kong university is expanding undergraduate education from three years to four years because they think it is not giving students enough time. there are all these buildings going up. here we are being told in the united states that maybe we should reduce ourselves from four years to three years. another aspect. let me insert here so much of what our discussio
at this hour, there they, they're all down. not great in france, but germany down about .7% and the ftse down fractionally. other news out of europe, debt tieback for from an day to receive additional buyback offers. those would be at deeply discounted prices and that would help lower the country's debt lead. >>> in asia, stocks touched a 16-month high and closed mostly higher on the session with good gains, as you can see, with the kospi up the most, 1.5 points. >> strong nebs out of china which suggest maybe the economy is rebounding more than expected. >> the exports. >> yeah. >> among the catalyst in asia trading today, economic stats out of china. export growths slowed sharply to 2.9% in december. that news j underscores the global headwinds dragging on the economy. but the chinese economy is showing solid signs of a pick up in domestic activity. industrial output was stronger than expected. the country has been saying for years it needs to shift a little bit from the export model the internal consumption. let their middle class grow and not be nearly as dependent on exports. and china's
, therefore we'll let japan, korea, germany, china, you name it, own this space, then we will have failed. >> this new effort is part of president obama's energy strategy to reduce america's reliance on foreign oil. >>> well, you have heard about the freshman 15. how about the google 15? >> they were putting on weight from the access to the foods, the free food and all of or cafes and microkitchens. >> tonight how tech workers are losing weight with a traffic light system. >> meteorologist paul deanno in the weather center. we had fat rainfall totals in the bay area over the past 24 hours. some of you got up to 4" of rain. look at the radar right now and show you what's going on. not that much. we'll talk about when that rain will return and how much you will get on the weekend coming up. >> ahead we know the bowl game assignment for san jose state football. and not to be ignored is the volleyball power which has been flying under the radar in the public eye until now. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, companies and workers gettig smarter about their health. dr. kim mulvhill reports: te strategy wor
yet. scott, i have a question for you. just noticed today france and germany's stock markets hit 52-week highs. we're still wringing our hands over the debt crisis, and the equity markets are hitting new highs for the year. is it too late to get into those markets? >> i don't think so, bill, at all. all the european markets are up for the year except portugal, which is up slightly. even greece is up year to date. i don't think you're too late on that trade at all. in fact, i think, quite frankly, the structural changes that are happening in europe could produce growth for many years come. >> where are you putting money to work, george? >> the fiscal cliff is sort of the uncertainty du jour. people are always worried about next uncertainty. you need to blow past that and think about where the next good stocks going to be, how can i invest, how can i participate? taxes are likely to go up, but this is a lot of rattling. both sides of the aisle would come together. they'll figure out what's best. at the end of the day, they know they have to help the little guy, the consumer. pool corp
to 250,000. before she goes to germany for more treatment. there is an election in louisi
with an average of 182 in germany. 10,000 987 compared with an average of 182 in germany, 75 in spain and 47 in the united kingdom. mexico, their average about 5,980 annual homicides, still half of ours by firearms during that same period. colombia was higher. an executive director of the chicago crime lab has said that this is an outliar and lethal violence. other countries have similar rates of rape and battery but said because so much american violence includes guns, includes guns, the rate of death of so much higher. steady gun violence leads especially, young blacks and latino men are likely to die in a shooting. each year from 2006 to 2010, homicide is the leading cause of death for african-american males from ages 15 to 24 more than the next nine causes of death combined according to the ces for disease control and prevention. gun violence is part of a complex cycle born of poverty and residential segregation as is poor health and substandard education, which all are related to the poverty and the persistent gun violence. challenges that the nation has yet to truly face and address. a
's on to germany. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then tonight, i'm trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with the new global account from schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i hunt down opportunities around the world tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 as if i'm right there. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i'm in total control because i can trade tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 directly online in 12 markets in their local currencies. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i use their global research to get an edge. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 their equity ratings show me how schwab tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 rates specific foreign stocks tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 based on things like fundamentals, momentum and risk. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i also have access to independent tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 firms like ned davis research tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and economist intelligence unit. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 plus, i can talk to their global specialists 24/7. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and trade in my global account commission-free tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 through march 2013. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 best part... no jet lag. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 call 1-800-790-3801 tdd#: 1-8
from germany and asked, how did she get the unemployment rate -- improve the unemployment rate that quickly? she said they immediately made a decision to whether i saw the homes in germany. that's energy efficiency rate their future but all the people back to work and from the 3% as the kinds of things you could do. >> picking people up the inconvenient truths at one point was that movie and "avatar" sometimes supposed to be that movie. do you think there's an environmental movie to change peoples minds? >> the inconvenient truth is screaming loud for a sequel because the inconvenient truth has exposed the problem, but it is not ever really told us about his dissolution. i think the next step one has to do is people are waiting for a very important project as "avatar" with a convenient truth, other films are very good because no matter how you put it, as i said in my speech, people don't care if you're breathing republican era democratic era. people just want to breathe air. but when they go to the faucet, they want to turn on the water and know that water is clean and not pack
the best translators in this country. it will be like east germany because people will be afraid to be themselves that's why we have the fourth amendment. >> steve: i wonder how many terrorists activities or plots have been stopped by this program. >> you know, a good question. we probably will never know. >> steve: because it's a question -- which is the greater risk? that we listen in on some international phone calls or another 9-11? >> that's a very good question ask judgment that the congress is not permit to do make because the fourth amendment -- >> steve: that is what they're too long. >> ha is what they're doing. when the congress changes the constitution, it is acting unconstitutionally. only the states. you just talked about amending the constitution. only the states can change the constitution. so the fourth amendment says you want to snoop? get a search warrant. judges available 24/7. >> gretchen: read your column on foxnews.com and i hope i see you on studio b. i'll be hosting for sheppard. >> what a lively day this will be. >> merry christmas. >> steve: make up you
't all the countries out there. both canada and germany have higher marginal tax rates than the yits does. germany and canada have borrowing rates about the same as the united states and have higher home ownership rates. they have health care and education paid for. great life satisfaction in those places and strong economies. what's the argument if we increase the tax rates on the richest americans, we're somehow going to have economic catastrophe. >> ali, as you know when people pay taxes, they not only pay it at the individual level, but capital gains and other taxes, first you earn money and then you invest it in companies and if you take a look at corporate income tax and all of the companies you threw up, the united states has the highest -- >> the united states doesn't have the highest effective corporate tax rate. they have the highest marginal tax rates and most companies as you know, including general electric, the biggest, don't pay any taxes. right? >> the marginal tax rate is the tax rate that matters on the actual dollar earned. when we look at canada, about 17%, the europea
germany. >>> it's the top of the hour. you're in the "cnn newsroom." i'm martin savidge. let's a pleasure to be with you. >>> right now in the nation's capital, senators are working to try to keep all of us from going off that fiscal cliff. we've been talking about that for what seems like, well, forever. they've got to reach a deal by new year's day. here's what's happening right now. senate leaders on both sides are trying to reach a budget deal hoping to avert a 2% hike in everyone's paychecks early next year. plus 2 million unemployed people stand to lose their jobless benefits. jessia yellen, the president says he's optimistic but he sure had a firm tone after meeting with the senate and house leaders yesterday. let's just give that a listen. >> so the american people are watching what we do here. obviously, their patience is already thin. this is deja vu all over again. america wonders why it is that in this town for some reason, you can't get stuff done in an organized timetable. why everything always has to wait till the last minute. well, we're now at the last minute. and the ame
them. laws in the u.s. don't apply to a hacking group in germany, for example. >> talk about the bigger issue. cyber security in general, because as you know leon panetta said earlier this year the next pearl harbor might be through cyber warfare. >> yeah. >> is this something that at this point people recognize? is the problem getting worse or better? >> the potential for a major strike, this pearl harbor idea he's put out there, that is not hyperbole. this could be the most efficient ay for those who want to strike our government and society or any other because it doesn't require the physical manifestations of previous terrorism where you have to go disrupt infrastructure take over aircraft do physical destruction. you can stay in your own country, reach out for almost no cost, and deploy software that can bring down utilities, hospitals. worst of all, it could squirrel financial markets. i don't think anything is a higher risk than the ability of going after financial markets and subtly causing problems not turning out the lights on the nyse but jus
campaign to run germany for a third time. the election is in the third quarter of next year. she actually warned against premature optimism over the crisis saying the worst is not over and we must be cautious going forward. now to a certain extent she would say that, would she not? otherwise we're not out of the woods. keep me in charge. but that was the message that came out of germany today. elsewhere as we kind of wait for things to happen, it's interesting the bond markets continue to rally. we were talking about this yesterday that greece has priced the debt buyback where it has. it will be more generous and next week they're likely to get their money from the rest of the european union. taking some of those concerns back out of the market so, again, today the spanish bond market rallying and, therefore, the yield forming. still above 5% but falling. it's also true of italy. there the yields are down. take a look at where we are on the ten year, 4.4% and those bonds rise in value, you see the italian banks, for example, rising in value. the stock market, it's obvious the value of the
the promise of the strategy, which has been used in germany, of the national manufacturing innovation hubs. that is something we will to promote in a second term and expand further. >> over here. >> thank you. every child matters. i applaud you for your comments about the need not to have less having money for children versus money for research and other vital needs in the domestic discretionary budget. the question is, where do we find more revenue? and have you considered taxes on stock transfers and stock transactions or other kinds of innovative -- carbon taxes, other kinds of approaches where we can find new revenue that it would be possible for us to have amongst ourselves for important resources? >> it is going to shock you to know that i'm not here to make news on a new revenues. [laughter] we are busy fighting right now to make sure that we have a budget agreement that is very balanced, and part of that balance is having enough high income revenues together with smart entitlement savings. that is the balance that people talk about the most. the other balances to make sure that you
. they no longer have much in common with one another. >> more on life and soviet east germany sunday night at 8:00 on c-span's "q&a." >> punched me, to me, take things from me. >> he is not safe on that bus. >> i have been on that bus and they are as good as gold. >> all of us were starting to see people coming out and talking about their experience of this phenomenon that so many of us have experienced in one way or another and have no words for, other than adolescents. finally, people are starting to stand back and say, this is not actually a normal part of growing up. this is not a normal right of passage. there was a moment where there was a possibility for change. we decided to start the film out of that feeling that voices were bubbling up. coming up to the surface to say, this is not something we can accept any more as a normal part of our culture. >> the filmmaker has followed up for award winning film by gathering essays. -- her toward women -- her award winning film by gathering essays. >> the fiscal cliff negotiations, with particular attention to social security. we spoke to an asso
a bit of a decline for germany and france and modest moves across all of these markets. the bank of japan easing monetary policy again today, announcing an increase of its asset buying and lending program by more than $118 billion. that move was widely expected as part of the reason that you had seen the yen under quite a bit of pressure, yesterday, at least. you'll see right now that in japan, the market there actually closed down by just over 1%, 1.2% almost. the hang seng and the shanghai composite were slightly higher. oil prices this morning, you'll see right now, are down by about 4 cents to $89.94, so you have things to pick up in those prices over the last couple of days. and the ten-year note at this point which yesterday was yielding above 1.8%, dropping down to 77.2%. finally, take a look at the dollar and gold. yen is at 83.99. gold prices this morning with all these movements in the currency markets up by about $1.10. >>> winter storm draco is moving across the united states threatening retailers and holiday travelers. paul, we know that sometimes the storms could be
. germany's economic position is arguably deteriorating but still schauble there is relatively optimistic that the crisis is over. in the meantime what is also happening is this money is beginning to flow into, from the public safety net to support the banks so you have the recapitalization of the banks but that isn't of course good news for everybody in the case of the ipo from last year you have 53,000 small shareholders there effectively having their positions in the debt smashed against the whole. they've been selling out again today to try and retrieve what they can because it is in the negative equity and arguably they'll get nothing as we go through the motions further down the line. it lost another 25% of what is left of the market capitalization today. a number of the other spanish banks are also in negative territory and some of the spanish big industrials are also down today. under performance on madrid. just got to mention where we are on the greek banks. they are now going through a position where the central bank is saying we think they need 27, 28 billion euros. the questio
countries -- germany says it's going to send in soldiers to neighboring turkey. why do you suppose there is such anxiety and such fear around that country and the possibility that that could happen? >> well, within the context of what turkey asked nato for, the patriot missile defense system, you have nato member countries who are now essentially saying through their partly i wants, yes, we are going to help you militarily defend yourself. the big question, however, is are other countries bringing up the possible threat of chemical weapons coming from syria as a way of laying the ground work for another kind of not intervention, but a assistance to rebel groups. you have a lot of strategic talk that's being publicly sort of expressed out there that could be laying the ground work for strategic help for rebel groups. also for russia and iran and china and other countries that support the assad regime to perhaps distance themselves a little bit from the syrian president. we have all those reasons that are coming -- that are like the pieces of the puzzle. you make it out. is the threa
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war and why the economies of germany and japan took off after world war two. these conflicts destroy the network of interest groups that might have blocked growth and development. obviously, we don't want to have a war to clean out the interest groups system, but a political upheaval, a change in the party regime could accomplish that as it has done in the past. this is one of that contribution of americans party revolutions. the cleanup interest group systems and eliminate roadblocks, reform, expansion and dynamism. those are real advantages of the people. ladies and gentlemen, let's see what else i have here -- that is a chart on productivity. obviously, going down from the '50s and '60s, if we have a decline in work force in relation to people who are retired, he might wake up for that -- might wake up for that of the work force is productive. that is not really happen '90s and that usually attributed to the internet revolution. but that has burned off pretty quickly. that's a chart that shows that distribution of gdp by income groups and shows in the 1920's, the top 1% gain a dis
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our top ten stories of 2012 next. >>> you know me as carl. hey, mom. stationed in germany. shoutout to all my family in trentth, new jers trenton, new jersey. i miss you all, i love you all. if you missed it, it's your fault. i did my part. [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover aleve. all day pain relief with just two pills. >>> here is the mug shot after crapo's arrest in a washington, d.c. suburb. he's a mormon and supposedly doesn't drink alcohol, but it turns out crapo, in fact, does drink alcohol given the arr
-old. we know central banks committed. we know avi in japan will raise, we know germany is a big economy. i would pay close attention to cross trades like the euro/yen. i don't think you need to answer the fiscal cliff issues. foreign exchange is a better place to be, even with the manipulation of central banks. >> ed, jump in here in terms of areas that you want to avoid. where do you think the areas of this market are that really get hit the hardest on the fiscal cliff the lack of fiscal cliff deal. >> absolutely. and maria, i think it is important to underscore one fact. no matter what the resolution is on the fiscal cliff, it is not going to help the balance sheet of this country. and the balance sheet of the world economy is in such disarray that the only way we solve this is by growth and all of the economies, not by taxing and not going about it the way the government is talking about it. the far and away, the number one place it avoid are long-term interest rates sensitive bonds in the united states. if there was ever an investment more obvious to avoid, i don't know what it is. sta
. and that, the united states will be doing, so will germany an the dutch. finally, another point to this, as we were talking with experts, you can put chemical weapons on scuds. that apparently has not been done but that was a concern. remember, just a week or two ago about the chemical weapons. so far it's conventional, but that's another worrisome thing. >> all right, jill dougherty, thank. >>> we have new numbers out from the u.s. census bureau. the agency predicts by 2043 white people will no longer make up the majority of americans. the u.s. population currently stands at 315 million people. it's expected to cross the 400 million threshold in 2051. officials say about 2060, the u.s. population will be considerably older and much more racially and ethically diverse. >> i was about to ask you how you feel about that. >> i'm fine with it. >> crazy question. >> i'm fine with it. >>> we've been talking about how the world has been changing and the browning of america, we were talking about this on soledad's show that a lot of kids are mixed now, and the whole identification thing is fasc
from germany and the austerity inspired by angela merkel. in particular, he is drawing attention to this. which is the spread of the extra that investors demand to hold italian bonds over german bonds. i've shown this to you a couple times. over the last year it's been a mainstay of a lot of the italian business broadcasts internally. they say our bonds are currently trading so many basis points above the germans on their hourly bulletins. that was one of the reasons why at the height of it berlusconi was kicked out of power. he's saying now this is a total calm. italians essentially should ignore it. he said the spread is a con. back to you, carl. >> he is back. silvio is back. >>> as we head into the final fomc meeting of 2012 fed policymakers have traders on edge. want to get to rick santelli on that in chicago. >> i'm on edge, all right. let's do a summary before i bring my guest and friend art nolan in. december 5th you have a 2.86 trillion fed balance sheet. you have 1.65 trillion of treasuries within that. you have 884 billion of mortgage-backed securities. of course, you
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